Raising Chickens: Precautions During Winter and Summer

Many people raise chickens as pets or for food. Raising chickens is a great way to produce eggs, meat, and manure while also providing companionship. However, raising chickens can be tricky during the winter and summer months.

Raising Chickens: Precautions During Winter and Summer

This blog post will discuss precautions that should be taken during the winter and summer seasons to keep your flock happy and healthy!

Raising Chickens: Precautions during Winter and Summer

Even though it seems like chickens are fragile creatures, they have certain characteristics that can let them survive through whatever weather may come. But you have to take note that not all chickens are alike.

While some can withstand winters, others preferred to sunbathe during summer sunshine. It will all depend on the weather that you are having when you decide to purchase the right kind of chicken so as not to waste money and time raising them and just have them end up in a chicken graveyard.

Winter Precautions to Take with Chickens

During wintertime or on cold weather days, never try heating your chickens just because you fear that they might catch a cold or freeze. You may find your flock dead in the morning.

How?

Just think of all that hay or straw bedding? You are just asking for a fire if you pop a heater or two in there. Even if you are raising chickens for the food – you don’t want to roast them all at the same time.

Winter Precautions to Take with Chickens

F.Y.I., chickens can adapt to extreme cold conditions because their body can change their metabolism as the cold weather approaches.

The bedding you keep in their shelter should be more than enough to help keep them warm.

If you live in a place where winters are more prominent than summer or are literally winter all the time, you might as well take certain actions for your chickens that will not put any of your chicken’s lives in danger.

a. Frostbite on chickens

There is a risk that a chicken’s wattle and comb can be affected by frostbite. To avoid this, you can rub some petroleum jelly or any moisturizer every other day.

What is frostbite?

Frostbite is a type of injury to body tissue, most commonly the skin, and underlying tissues. The damage can be minor or lead to severe medical problems. It happens by exposure to cold temperatures, especially when the skin is wet or numb. The water in the body tissues freezes and expands, damaging the cells.

Chicken water feeder

Frostbite can happen to any part of your body but it is most common in feet, hands, ears, or nose for people. We all know it often happens when people are outside for long periods of time without adequate protection from cold temperatures like gloves and hats, but chickens are vulnerable too.

b. Chicken Water Feeder

Look out for frozen water supply. You can’t deprive them of water. They will not drink from a frozen water outlet well, because they simply can’t. Chickens can’t take water with impurities. It must always stay fresh and clean.

You can take out a water heater so that the water stays in its liquid form. Or if you don’t have one, better bring the waterer inside the house then return it in the morning.

Summer Precautions to Take with Chickens

If you live in places where summer is the only known season, your chickens are prone to be exposed to excessive heat all the time. With this, they might be at risk of dehydration.

The only thing that you have to look out for during summer is that their water supply never runs dry. It must always have clean water.

Don’t let your chickens roam around without providing them a sort of shade. If there is no run, you can provide ventilation inside the pen.

Summer Precautions to Take with Chickens

During heat waves, hens would lay fewer eggs. If this occurs, it is a typical sign that your chicken is stressed because of the excessive heat. Have no worries though, their egg-laying tendencies will go back to normal once the heat recedes.

If things get worse, you have to observe the behavior of your chickens. What is manifesting? If you’ve seen that one catches a cold or is acting a bit odd, isolate the chicken instantly to prevent the further spread of the disease.

Just don’t forget to provide water and feed to the isolated animal.

Then, when things are manageable, consult with your vet. Tell him or her how your chicken/s are reacting.

Are they having:

a. Mites?

Mites are a problem for chickens because they are often found on chickens’ bodies, around the vent, and under the wings. Mites can be transferred to humans if we have close contact with them. It is not only unsanitary but also itchy and uncomfortable for both your chicken as well as you.

b. Abnormality in the stool? (blood, worms, and/or white droppings)

Summer Precautions to Take with Chickens

Their stool is a great way to learn more about the heath of your birds. If you’ve seen changes in their droppings, consult with your vet immediately.

c. Sneezing and teary eyes?

Do chickens have allergies or get colds? They can be a sign of upper respiratory disease in chickens.

If you’ve found that one of your hens is sneezing and has watery eyes, consult with your vet because it might need some medication to recover from the said illness. You should also isolate the chicken for at least two weeks until good health is restored.

God forbid you have to deal with the bird flu with your flock!

d. Depressed Chickens?

Yes, chickens can get depressed. And that’s not all.

You should also be on the lookout for chickens who are straying from their flock, have a droopy posture, and appear to be uncoordinated in movement as well as appetite loss. This could mean they might need some medical attention or even rehabilitation if it has been prolonged. In these cases, specially made chicken products might be necessary.

e. Unable to mingle with the flock?

Whenever an animal isolates itself from a flock or herd , it is always a sign that something might be wrong. If one of your chickens appears to have an issue with its eyesight, coordination, or social demeanor, there is a high chance they are sick and need some medical attention.

Summer Precautions to Take with Chickens

The bottom line?

Tell your vet what you actually see so that he or she can give you the appropriate answer to your dilemma. These are only bits of areas that you have to ponder upon regarding raising your chickens in winter or summer atmospheres. It’s better to be safe than very sorry.

Other articles you may find helpful:

What You Need to Know About A Prepper Convention

Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced prepper, prepper conventions are a great way to get more information.  At the convention, you’ll find people who share in your lifestyle.  You’ll also learn about new gear and tools that can make your life easier and increase your chance of survival.

What You Need to Know About A Prepper Convention

Prepper conventions are a great way to learn and grow.  You’ll find people with a wide range of skills, and you can gain valuable knowledge by spending time with other like minded people. 

What You Need to Know About A Prepper Convention

Although most people think that living as a prepper means every man for himself, that’s isn’t the case for conventions.  Many preppers enjoy coming together to learn new techniques and gain valuable knowledge about survival and other important life skills.

What Is a Prepper Convention?

Prepper conventions are large events that are held annually.  They usually have respected experts who speak at the events so you can learn about new techniques and ideas to use.  There are usually vendor tables with gear and equipment so you can learn what’s new.  It’s a great way to see the equipment before you buy it, and sometimes you can get great deals.

However, the best part about attending a prepper convention is that you’ll meet like-minded people and families that you can learn from.  Although you may not live close to each other and may have different goals and needs, you can still learn from each other and help each other grow.

What Is a Prepper Convention?

Although you may be looking for a prepper convention that is specifically for preppers, there are only a few of these held in America.  However, there are several conventions for emergency preparedness and homesteading that will have a lot of overlap with prepping.

The following are the larger conventions related to prepping, survival, and homesteading.  These conventions often attract thousands of people from surrounding states and even all across the country.  However, you can usually find small prepping conventions that may not have as many vendors and exhibitors, but that doesn’t mean that you won’t find valuable information there.  

Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo

The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo is held in Whitmore Lake, Michigan, in September each year.  It’s not one of the most well-known prepper conventions, but it is a great one to attend. 

This convention has information about communications, gardening, cooking, first aid, and more.  It has a variety of topics that will appeal to preppers of all levels.

Although it is a smaller expo, there are several training classes and demonstrations available.  There are also vendors so you can see new products and tools.

Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo

Prepper Camp

Prepper Camp offers peppers the full prepping experience in the Appalachian Mountains. .  It features living off-grid, homesteading, camping, survival, and preparedness.  It focuses on hands-on training with demos so you can learn more than you can at just a speech.  

Other expos and conventions provide information from speakers, but Prepper Camp lets you do things.  You’ll learn from the experts who not only tell you about it, but they also show you.  You’ll also get to participate and gain valuable experience.

Lodging isn’t an issue because you can camp on site.  You can also hike and boat while you’re there.

Survival, Gun, and Outdoor Show

The Survival, Gun, and Outdoor Show is held in Rock Island, Illinois.  It’s a large convention with 100s of vendor tables.  You’ll find gear and equipment for prepping, defense, fishing, outdoors, and more.  

In addition to vendors, there are seminars and classes for attendees to learn more about preparedness.  

Survival, Gun, and Outdoor Show

PrepperCon

PrepperCon is held in Salt Lake City, Utah.  It covers first aid, survival, prepping, gear, defensive training, and food storage.  There are just under 100 presentations and classes offered.  They have trusted experts who have extensive knowledge to share.  This is a family-friendly convention, and many people bring their children.  

Sustainable Preparedness Expo

The Sustainable Preparedness Expo is held in different locations around the country.  It focuses on self-reliance and preparedness for natural disasters.  Although the focus is on survival, it teaches valuable life skills for preppers and homesteaders.

Homesteading Life Conference

The Homesteading Life Conference in Missouri is geared towards homesteaders, but there’s a lot of overlap for preppers and survivalists.  It focuses on day to day life rather than a disaster.  You’ll learn how to grow food and how to preserve the food that you grow.  It also has information on off grid living, herbal remedies, and how to protect your homestead from predators.

National Preppers and Survivalists Expo

The National Preppers and Survivalists Expo is held in Jacksonville, Florida.  It is a two-day event where attendees will get hands-on experience for survival skills.  It has classes and lectures about survival and emergency preparedness.  

Prepper Convention Books

Prepper Convention Books

These prepper conventions are sprinkled throughout the country, so you may not find one close to you.  However, there are several smaller shows in many areas of the country, so do a quick Internet search to see if there’s a smaller show near you.  

If traveling isn’t an option, then you might consider looking at books and other resources for prepping.  Although you won’t get to talk to other people like you do at a convention, you will be able to gain knowledge from home.  

You may also want to read homesteading or prepping blogs.  These blogs are written by people who are living this life, and they will have tips and tricks as well as general knowledge to help you learn and grow.

When you’re prepping, there’s always new information to learn.  Attending a convention is a great way to learn from experts through talks or through hands-on demonstrations.  In addition, you’ll also be able to browse vendor tables to see the latest tools and equipment available to purchase.  

Attending an expo is also a great way to get to know like-minded people.  Although these people may not live close to you, you can exchange information and keep learning from each other long after the convention is over.

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Introducing the New Birds on the Block: Raising Chickens 101

Raising chickens is a tradition that was brought to North America by the Europeans during the 1600s. In this blog post, we look at introducing new birds on the block: raising chickens 101!

Introducing the New Birds on the Block: Raising Chickens 101

The introduction of new chickens to an established group can be a tricky process. Introducing the “new” birds requires some attention and care, just like merging two restaurants into one when you have Italian food on one side and Chinese cuisine on the other – it’s bound to cause stress!

Introducing the New Chickens to Your Flock

With new chickens entering the flock, there is often tension between old and young hens. The newcomer to the chicken coop may not be accustomed to its surroundings or have a strong social bond within that group of birds. These tensions can lead to bullying behaviors among both newcomers as well as older members in more established groups which can cause injury for individual animals and damage long-term relations amongst flocks.

Many poultry owners who are ready to expand their chicken farm make preparations by importing birds from outside sources (such as other farms), while others take time waiting for eggs they purchased at auction sites like eBay, Craig’s list, etc., after being hatched by laying hens on one property -or even neighbors’ homes! Adding new breeds into your

I always thought that hens and roosters were only territorial in regards to certain areas of the coop. I never realized they could get so worked up over who was entering their home until now!

I have had many new chickens come into my flock over time, but it wasn’t until one newcomer would not let an old chicken take her water pan for a drink before things got intense. The newcomers are naturally trying to establish themselves by taking control or what they believe is theirs; meanwhile, the older ones will fight back as best as possible with whatever strategy will keep them on top like kicking out another bird from its nest space or splashing any perceived threat off-balance with feathers and water.

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Fret not, for this kind of attitude and feud lasts for only a couple of days. Adaptation can now take place. You can’t avoid this kind of predicament from rising but you can do certain adjustments that can make all of you happy and stress-free.

There are numerous peace-making strategies to help both parties adjust to each other. Isn’t it nice to see your new and old birds in one space without having to stop them from pecking one another?

Keep them close, but separate

One very good strategy is to let them see each other without having any physical contact. How? If you have a run (which is basically attached to the coop), you could put your old chickens there and then put a border (chicken wire) between the run and the coop. Put your new chickens inside the coop. This way, they are able to see each other minus the harm. Be sure that both parties have access to sufficient food and water. You can do this for about a week.

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Another strategy is introducing the new chickens to a separate pen for about two weeks. This will give them time to get used to their surroundings and allow themselves some energy-saving at night without having so many eyes on them 24/hours a day in the coop area.

As transition day comes, that will be a week after the slight introduction, you can now “join” them in one area. You can transfer the newcomers to the resident flock’s territory during the night when all the birds are sleeping. Upon waking up, the old chickens will notice the new ones and they will, at any point, try to start a fight but will not because they are too groggy to initiate it.

One at a time

Introducing new chickens to a flock of old birds involves introducing one at a time. They are introduced by leaving them inside the coop with an older chicken for about two hours, so they get acquainted and comfortable enough that you can leave both together overnight.

The next day, introduce another one in between feeding times and repeat until all your newcomers meet up with each other before introducing them outdoors!

If this sounds like too much work, remember that introducing newly acquired chickens to an established group is very important to prevent any possible pecking order problems or territorial disputes. It’s best if done gradually but it may need some “dealing with” on certain occasions when everyone isn’t getting along as well as it should be.

raising chickens

Try distracting them

There are a number of distraction techniques that can be effective. This includes things like getting the older chickens out of their coop for some free time, or feeding them nearby to give the new birds a chance to settle in without being harassed by the old hens.

Some of the best distracting techniques are:

a. Cabbage heads can do the trick. By hanging a piece of whole cabbage just above their head, chickens will reach it until everything is finished. That is if they don’t get exhausted by jumping to it and reaching it.

b. Make the pursuit an obstacle for the pursuing party. Add large branches inside the run and coop. How does this help? It will make it more difficult for the old birds to get at the new ones.

c. Let them run around at a wider and freer range. The oldies will be so thrilled to dig for grubs and insects they wouldn’t even notice that there are newcomers roaming around.

In conclusion:

There is no 100% foolproof way on how to avoid territorial disputes among your flock but there are strategies that will make it easier for everyone involved in settling down with each other. The best thing would be if all parties transitioned smoothly into their new surroundings without any problems or injuries but this doesn’t always happen (despite our efforts).

raising chickens

If it happened every single time, then we wouldn’t have had anything worth reading about! It’s best if done gradually but it may need some “dealing with” on certain occasions when everyone isn’t getting along as well as it should be.

Introducing newly acquired chickens into an established group of older birds requires patience (especially when introducing one bird at a time) but is worth the wait considering it offers less tension between hens as they adjust themselves to each other’s presence.

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Preparing Your Homestead for Survival: Don’t Overstock Your Homestead

Preparing Your Homestead for Survival: Don’t Overstock Your Homestead

Don’t leave anything dear to you

always a risk of things being stolen or lost from your homestead, so if it’s important to you, keep it at your regular home

Avoid stocking up too much food

(having food and water there is important if you have to be there in a pinch, but leaving too much food there may end up being a waste if it all goes bad)

Homestead pantry staples

Too many supplies can attract outsiders

(whether it be looters thieves, or even animals, lots of supplies and food in one location can attract a lot of unwanted attention while you’re away)

  • Many predators can be scared off (by making yourself look big and making noise, many predators will take you for something large and dangerous and not want to mess with you)
  • Know your local animals (if you have brown bears around and you try to use tactics that work with black bears, you’ll very possibly end up dead. Know the differences in your local predator populations)
  • Keeping Predators Away (things like fires will keep predators away from where you’re sleeping more often than not, as they’ve usually learned to fear fires)

How to Prevent Bird Flu in Chickens

Several years ago, the bird flu spread quickly and infected birds all over the world. Every chicken keeper in the world was aware of the deadly effects of avian influenza. 

How to Prevent Bird Flu in Chickens

The bird flu became the number one cause of death for chickens in Asia and around the world.  The bird flu is thought to have originated in China.  It killed millions of chickens and basically halted their chicken industry.  

How to Prevent Bird Flu in Chickens

Although this is a strain of flu that spreads quickly among chickens, it can also infect humans.  The virus can be passed from chicken to chicken, from chicken to human, from human to human, and from human to chicken.  For this reason, health officials all over are taking this disease seriously to stop the spread.

Bird Flu in Chickens Symptoms

The bird flu in chickens is much more serious than a common cold.  If just one bird gets infected, it can kill the entire flock within a week.  If it is passed from a chicken to a human, that person can infect hundreds of people before they even realize that they are sick.  Avian flu affects people of all ages, including children and the elderly.

If a human being gets infected, it can take about three to five days from the time of exposure to experience symptoms.  The first symptoms or signs of bird flu in people are similar to the cold symptoms.  The person may have a fever, sore throat, cough, or muscle aches.  Some people will have conjunctivitis.  

bird flu symptoms

If the person doesn’t get treatment, the disease can quickly progress and get more severe.  The bird flu can lead to viral pneumonia and even acute respiratory distress.  These respiratory problems are the leading cause of death for people who get the bird flu.

How to Prevent Bird Flu

Raising chickens has several benefits, including fresh eggs and meat if you choose to use your birds for meat.  However, raising a flock of backyard chickens also takes a lot of work.  There are several problems that can arise, including avian flu.

One way chicken keepers can prevent the bird flu is by keeping the coop and their chicken area very clean.  The World Health Organization (WHO) has studied diseases around the world, and they have guidelines for keeping you and your flock safe. 

They are also in charge of tracking chickens and people who are afflicted with bird flu and studying how it travels.  They keep records of confirmed cases and deaths from diseases.  If there are a lot of cases in an area, WHO will put that area under quarantine.

How to Prevent Bird Flu

When an area is in quarantine, people who are in that area will not be allowed to leave.  Those outside of that area can not enter the area.  It’s important for agencies, including WHO, to have accurate information otherwise more people and chickens will be affected, which can save lives.

Since avian flu can quickly spread around the world, governments also have strict rules if the virus enters their country.  People in that area are asked to report signs or symptoms of this and other diseases and to be on the watch for potential bird flu cases.  This helps protect both humans and chickens, and it can save many lives if those affected are quarantined quickly.

How Do Birds Get Bird Flu?

Avian Influenza can be caused by dirty conditions and exacerbated by cold weather.  It’s important to determine what causes the bird flu so you can take prevention measures to stop the spread.  As a chicken keeper, it’s less expensive to prevent bird flu than to treat it and to risk losing your flock or being infected yourself.

Although you can’t change the weather, it’s still important to recognize that cold weather can increase the risk of bird flu in your flock.  Like human influenza, the bird flu is passed around quicker in cold weather.  The birds tend to be closer together in their coop, and the virus quickly jumps from bird to bird.  

How Do Birds Get Bird Flu?

To protect your flock, you can keep them healthy by supporting their immune systems.  Feed them healthy food so they get plenty of vitamins and minerals to keep their bodies healthy.  You can also immunize your chickens to protect them from some diseases.

A dirty coop can also help avian flu spread.  Your coop and the area in their pen and around it should be kept very clean.  Whether you use wood shavings or straw, clean it regularly to prevent contamination from fecal matter.  

When you clean the coop, protect yourself by wearing rubber boots, gloves, and a face mask with a respirator so you don’t breathe in the dust particles from the litter.  By keeping your coop and the area around it clean, you can stop the virus from spreading as fast.  

What To Do If Your Birds Have Bird Flu

If you suspect that your chickens have avian flu, the disease can spread through a coop quickly.  You should take precautions immediately to stop the spread.  Wash your hands with soap and water every time you are near your chickens or in the coop.  Even if you don’t handle your chickens or touch anything in the coop, wash your hands when you are done.

In addition to keeping your chickens healthy, it’s important to keep yourself healthy.  Get exercise and eat a healthy diet to support your immune system.

If you suspect that one of your chickens has avian flu, call your vet right away.  Your chicken can be treated with an antiviral medication to reduce the symptoms and the severity of the disease.  However, these medications can not always prevent death.

What To Do If Your Birds Have Bird Flu

Practice good hygiene when handling raw chicken in the house.  Disinfect cutting boards with chlorine bleach to kill germs.  To effectively kill germs, dilute 4 to 6 teaspoons of bleach in a gallon of water.

The bird flu isn’t a common condition for chickens, but it can decimate an entire flock in a matter of days.  It’s important to learn the signs and symptoms of the bird flu so that you can isolate sick chickens and take precautions to protect the rest of your birds and your family.  Keep your coop clean and practice good hygiene when you are around your flock to prevent the spread of this disease.

Check out our other animal articles if you found bird flu in chickens helpful:

Top Chicken Raising Tips: Give Your Chickens Treats!

Give your chickens treats? Like people, chickens like treats.  If you have a backyard flock of chickens, it’s fun to spoil your chickens and offer them treats.  

Chicken Raising Tips: Give Your Chickens Treats!

While humans like chocolate, candy, and sweet things as treats, chicken treats are usually mealworms, vegetables, or fruits.  In addition to being tasty, offering your chickens treats alleviates boredom.  When chickens get bored, they can start pecking each other and some breeds can get aggressive.

Some chicken keepers even train their chickens to come when they hear the treats so they can quickly call in their birds if one wanders too far or there’s a predator or inclement weather.

Chicken Treats

There are special chicken treats and mealworms available in pet stores.  These treats are great options for your birds, but they can get expensive.  Most chicken keepers turn to kitchen scraps for treats.  Your birds will love most kitchen scraps, and they can be a good supplement for their diet and help combat boredom.  

However, it’s important to watch what you give your chickens for treats.  Although they can have several different kinds of foods, there are some foods that they can not eat because they can be harmful.  

Best Treats for Chickens

Even though chickens aren’t the most intelligent animals, they do have their own preferences for treats.  You might notice that some of your flock won’t eat certain things.  Like people, chickens have their own tastes and preferences.

Yogurt 

Chickens like yogurt, and it’s good for their gut health.  Yogurt also has calcium that the chickens use for eggshells.  In the summer, spread yogurt on a pan and freeze it.  Then offer your chickens yogurt bark for a cool treat.

Give your chickens treats: Apples

Most chickens will happily eat apples.  They like both applesauce and raw apples.  Apple seeds contain trace amounts of cyanide, so be sure to core the apples before serving to your chickens.

give your chickens treats

Banana

Chickens love bananas, but they won’t eat the peel.  Bananas are a good source of potassium, so it’s good for their muscles.

Broccoli and Cauliflower

Although your kids won’t think broccoli and cauliflower are treats, your chickens will.  You can toss the whole head in the coop or hang it so they can peck at it.  These are great boredom busters for winter.

Cabbage

Like heads of broccoli, heads of cabbage are great for hanging.  The birds will peck at it and have fun chasing it as it moves around.

Give your chickens treats: Carrots

Chickens love carrots cooked or raw.  They will even eat the leaves off of carrots if you grow them in your garden.

Crickets

Chickens eat small bugs in the wild.  If they get outside in the nice weather, they will often look for bugs in the soil.  In the winter or if you just want to have fun watching them, get some crickets from the pet store and watch your chickens chase them.

Cucumbers

If you give your chickens cucumbers, give them mature cucumbers because the seeds and flesh are softer.

Give your chickens treats: Eggs

I know, this just seems all kinds of wrong. You can also feed your chickens their own eggs.  Avoid feeding them raw eggs because it could encourage them to eat their own eggs after they lay them.  Instead, scramble them and offer them scrambled eggs.

give your chickens treats

Fish or Seafood

Give chickens fish or seafood sparingly because it can alter the taste of their eggs.

Flowers

Chickens like marigolds, pansies, and nasturtiums.  Make sure the flowers haven’t been treated with pesticides.  

Fruit

Chickens like most fruits like cherries, pears, and peaches.  They also like grapes, but cut them into pieces because they can get stuck in their throat.

Give your chickens treats: Herbs

Chickens like fresh herbs.  They will eat lavender, cilantro, mint, basil, parsley, and oregano.

Corn

Chickens love corn on the cob.  You can simply put the cobs in the coop for them to peck at or hang them.  They will get every bit of corn off the cob and leave a clean cob for you to clean up.  

Watermelon

Chickens love watermelon.  Buy it when it’s cheap in the summer and freeze it.  Then give your chickens frozen watermelon to help them cool off.  They also love fresh watermelon, but they won’t eat the rind.

Give your chickens treats: Oatmeal

Chickens really like cooked oatmeal.  Simply prepare it with water or milk and serve warm to your chickens on cold days.  You should feed them steel cut or old fashioned oats because they are less processed.  You can also add fruits for more flavor and nutrition.

give your chickens treats

Pumpkins

Chickens love pumpkins.  Cut one in half and let them peck at it.  They will eat the stringy part, the seeds, and the flesh.  They will leave just the shell for you to pick up later.

Cottage Cheese

If your girls are laying eggs, you can offer them more calcium by giving them cottage cheese.  They will eat it plain, or you can add vegetables or fruit.

Eggshells

Eggshells are high in calcium, and chickens need to replenish their calcium to make more eggs.  When you use eggs, let the eggshells dry.  Then crush them by hand into about ¼ inch pieces.  Then sprinkle in the run or offer with their food.  Only give your chickens their own eggshells because other eggs can have bacteria that can harm your flock.

Leftovers

You can compost your leftover food through your chickens.  Be careful giving chickens people food though.  Don’t give them food that’s high in salt, sugar. or fat.  Also, do not give them anything that is spoiled or moldy. 

–>Chicken Treats to Avoid

There are some treats that you should not give your chickens.  Some of these can change the taste of their eggs, and other foods can be harmful for your chickens.

give your chickens treats

Garlic and Onions

Garlic and onions can change the taste of your eggs, so avoid giving them to your chickens.

Avocado 

Avocado pits and skins contain persin, which is toxic to chickens.  The flesh of the avocado is fine, however.

Beans

Avoid giving your chickens dried beans or undercooked beans.  They have hemagglutinin, which can affect the bird’s digestion and cause it to get sick.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb can act like a laxative.  Rhubarb that has been damaged by cold temperatures can be high in oxalic acid, which can kill a chicken.

Offering your chickens treats is a great way to dispose of food scraps, and your chickens will enjoy a special treat.  Chickens will quickly learn to come running when they see the scrap bucket heading towards the coop.   With this guide, you’ll be able to offer your chickens safe treats to keep them healthy and happy.

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